(COSMIC) CO/smoke Interrupting Circuit breaker

As Seen On

Test Your CO Detector:

Does Your Detector Work?

Do you live in a “Home Time-Bomb”? As a Texas Real Estate Broker, it has been commonplace to show over 1000 homes, and hire over 50 professional inspections annually for a broad variety of clients. My advice is to inspect EVERY residence regardless of Leasing or Owning. During inspections it is unfortunately normal to find multiple “Deficient” items, Carbon Monoxide (CO) scares me the most. CO is silent, odorless, colorless, tasteless, and can cause brain-damage or kill you, your family, and children in a matter of breaths. CO (from a technical prospective) has a specific gravity nearly identical to that of air, .9667 to be exact. CO is not heavier than air, it is ever so slightly lighter than air and will drift where air drifts, rise where air rises or circulate where air circulates. CO will not “Settle” until it settles in the lungs and blood-stream of its victims.

Here I found myself trying to help people find safe homes or businesses, and none of them appeared safe to me. None were safe, because no home or business that I ever showed had a system to evacuate carbon monoxide. Homes merely have the means to allow for the passive release of carbon monoxide, but that is NOT ENOUGH and I could not sleep at night.

Daughters, sons, sisters, brothers, fathers, mothers, aunts, uncles, grandparents and grandchildren all depending on me for my Advice and Opinions. The questions: “What does this mean?” “Is this safe?” and “What can we do about this?” My most common answer was, “I’m not an inspector, and you should ask your inspector”. All the while knowing… “This is NOT ENOUGH”.

Tell me this

  • Does your detector do anything but make noise?
  • Does your detector evacuate the smoke?
  • Does your detector create a path for smoke or CO to get out?
  • Do you have a path for CO to be forced out?
  • Can you force contaminants to flow out that path?
  • Is the contaminated air in that appliance closet or attic automatically forced out?
  • Do your bathroom fans detect CO and Smoke, and power on automatically?
  • Will your HVAC stop CO from returning, into rooms where CO did not exist?
  • Does your current Furnace turn off when smoke is present?
  • Can CO escape from your furnace area when the unit is turned off?
  • Does your garage door open automatically when it detects Carbon Monoxide?
  • Does a monitored alarm call the authorities for CO or smoke detected?
  • Do you have CO detectors at or near the level of your light switches?

If you answered “No” to any of these, you need COEVAC.

What

  • Does your detector evacuate the smoke or Carbon Monoxide (CO)?
    • Yes, it begins the process and buys you valuable seconds to get to safety.
  • Does your detector create a path for smoke or CO to get out?
    • Yes, a dedicated path with alarms outside to notify neighbors and first responders what to expect and where the problem is.
  • Do you have a path for CO to be forced out?
    • Yes, bathroom fan-vents, utility room vents, attic fans, vent-hoods, appliance vent-stacks, Garage Doors and more.
  • Can you force contaminants to flow out that path?
    • Yes, it’s forced out of your home when CO or Smoke are present; and turns on and off automatically.
  • Is the contaminated air in your appliance closet or attic automatically forced out?
    • Yes, when smoke or CO is present.
  • Do your bathroom fans detect CO and Smoke, and power on automatically?
    • Yes
  • Will your HVAC stop CO from returning into rooms where CO did not exist?
    • No, but COEVAC will stop power to your HVAC when smoke or CO are present
  • Does your current Furnace turn off when smoke is present?
    • No, but COEVAC will interrupt power to your furnace at this time.
  • Can CO escape from your furnace area when the unit is turned off?
    • Yes, but only when COEVAC provides power to the adjacent blower to force out the contaminants.
  • Does your garage door open automatically when it detects Carbon Monoxide?
    • Yes, thanks to COEVAC
  • Does a monitored alarm call the authorities if CO or smoke is detected?
    • No, but COEVAC will make that call.
  • Do you have CO detectors at or near the level of your light switches?
    • COEVAC does.

Where

COEVAC should be everywhere you sleep, and at the power or fuel source for every major appliance. COEVAC should be where you play, where you work, and where you eat indoors. COEVAC should be in your garage and in your attic.

Pick Your Poison

California CO Safety Video

Emergency Management Department

CO Evidence, How it Occurs